Urban and Community Forestry Committee

The Urban and Community Forestry Committee is comprised of urban forestry coordinators from each of the 20 member states and the District of Columbia. Urban forestry coordinators are responsible for leading state-level urban forestry programs in their respective states. Urban forestry is about the trees where people live, work and play - and so, includes trees and forests in our towns, along our streets, in our parks and in our backyards. State coordinators work with a wide range of constituents and partners including: local and tribal governments, school districts, nonprofits and community-based organizations all focused on improving the stewardship of trees and the ecosystem services they provide.


Resources

Call to Action 

Briefing Paper 

List of Resources 

GSI PowerPoint presentation

News & Announcements

Baby it’s hot outside!

August.  It’s one of the hottest months of the year and getting hotter.  In NJ, continued warming is projected with the state’s average annual temperature expected to rise another 4.1 to 5.7 degrees Fahrenheit by 2050 (2020 New Jersey Scientific Report on Climate Change). Heat, especially in our urban communities, is difficult on everyone but especially so for pregnant women and their unborn babies. When a woman is pregnant, her body is already working hard to keep her and the developing baby healthy, so adding the extra work of keeping cool can cause major body stress.  In communities of color, high temperatures are one of several factors that drive higher rates of premature deliveries, stillbirths and other dangerous pregnancy outcomes.1  

Downtown Trees for Comfort and Health


In Vermont, people know that winters are long, summers are glorious, and there are an awful lot of trees. But while the Green Mountains boast healthy forest cover that reflects their name, sustaining trees in Vermont’s urban and built environments is a challenge. Lack of adequate healthy soil, too little water, stresses from road salt, construction, or tree pests, and even normal aging and decline of downtown street trees require local urban foresters to stay on the lookout for appropriate places to plant new trees.

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