Urban and Community Forestry Committee

The Urban and Community Forestry Committee is comprised of urban forestry coordinators from each of the 20 member states and the District of Columbia. Urban forestry coordinators are responsible for leading state-level urban forestry programs in their respective states. Urban forestry is about the trees where people live, work and play - and so, includes trees and forests in our towns, along our streets, in our parks and in our backyards. State coordinators work with a wide range of constituents and partners including: local and tribal governments, school districts, nonprofits and community-based organizations all focused on improving the stewardship of trees and the ecosystem services they provide.


Resources

Call to Action 

Briefing Paper 

List of Resources 

GSI PowerPoint presentation

News & Announcements

Tree improve academic achievement – green space on school properties matter

Exposure to green spaces, including urban forests, not only help improve the attention function of students, but has also been found to contribute to increased academic performance. While research has continued to indicate the benefits of green spaces for health, such as decreased asthma prevalence [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] (Lovasi et al. 2008) or better concentration after activity in green spaces for children with ADHD [journals.sagepub.com] (Taylor and Kuo, 2009), trees in the schoolyard itself seems to have an impact on academic achievement. Multiple studies have shown benefits of local green spaces that cross economic and social boundaries, but availability of, and access to, green schoolyards is typically reduced/restricted in lower economic areas which, as noted, also provides health benefits.

The Case for Shade

On a hot summer day, it’s hard to resist the shade of a large tree. Planting trees to create shaded spaces has been integral into planning parks, schools and university campuses, businesses, as well as around our streets and homes. When planted properly a mature tree can save a homeowner up to 20% on energy costs (Arbor Day Foundation). For homes without air conditioning, shade trees can make the home feel cooler during summer heat.
 

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